Medical alert, or similar, bracelets, necklaces, cards etc. what are peoples thoughts?

@Liz59 has just come up with a very good question.
What are peoples thoughts about Medical Alert, or similar, bracelets, necklaces, cards etc?
Personally I always wore a medical alert bracelet when I was at work, however my manager complained it made a noise against my desk.
Then I moved on to the necklace.
I also carried a card with brief medical details and my meds on it in my purse and I still do. Some hospitals give them to patients.
The bracelet annoyed me because it was loose and sort of came over the back of my hand, I am not used to wearing bracelets let it be said.
The necklace annoyed me as it would show with loose tops on and the chain did not really look like jewellery and when I did Pilates it got in the way, again I am not used to wearing necklaces either. I now have it in my purse.
However I wore them both for many years.
We also had ‘a message in a bottle’ scheme locally where we had a special medically marked container in the fridge with all our medical details in.
There was a sticker for our fridge door (fridge since replaced) so medics coming to our home would see the sticker and know to look in the fridge for our medical details.
Funnily enough we only took it out of the fridge this week with my husband declaring he had never seen it before and the information was so out of date inside anyway.
If you have anything I think it has to be kept up to date and that can be difficult during treatment regimes.
On the necklaces and bracelets you are obviously limited to the information you can have engraved on them. I got my moneys worth, as I have several conditions. I also put my hospital number on mine.
It’s personal choice, nobody needs to have anything.
I await others thoughts.

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I have all my medical info logged into my iPhone and I carry a couple of cards with me

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@Erica @2DB for years I have had my contact details on a card after being inspired by this photograph .
Emergency services loved it after my car crash, but one extra point, make sure you create a digital key to your phone, emails etc. I use Lastpass and change the master password regularly .
I also carry a Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) card now days too

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Hi, great topic! I have all my details on my Health app on my phone, however, I also set up a folder with all my health records, emergency details, prescriptions, diagnosis, and consultant details, this was a godsend when I was admitted to A&E, they were able to understand my cancer and also make immediate contact with my consultant, there are some great books out there that also capture your information. I wear the SOS bracelet for my allergy as it informs people I carry a Epi-pen. I guess what ever works for you then do it :slight_smile:

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@McVey if you are security conscious and keep your phone locked, find a way to let the emergency services access it and then change your passwords afterwards

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With iPhone if you or someone else press the up volume and button to turn on you will get the screen which says turn off iPhone there will also be medical history and make an SOS call
Medical info can be accessed but not your phone
You will need to put in pass code to get back into it

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Great idea for a discussion, @Liz59 . I hadn’t thought of this.

Silly question but after diagnosis has it been suggested to anyone that we should carry something to identify our blood cancers? I suppose it makes sense considering the complexities of our various unique health issues.

Did you get given some kind of health ID, like @Erica described? There’s been no mention of this where I am, but that might be due to my haematologist’s lackadaisical approach, or due to my age. Is this an ageism thing?!

I love @2DB’s iPhone’s Medical History idea. I imagine most people carry phones with them these days, and paramedics will know to check for those and how to get health information from them, if that’s been input to begin with.

I’m going to put additional health details into my phone to draw attention to my main diagnosis, in case of emergencies. I didn’t know how to open that emergency screen on my phone though, so my husband helpfully reminded me to press the button on the phone’s right side 5 times, and hey presto :rescue_worker_helmet::iphone:

Perhaps someone with an Android phone can describe how to open a similar medical health screen on theirs?

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In the medical history it has all my emergency contacts plus I have

ICE (in case of emergency) in my contact list
I believe the emergency services know how to access ICE

I didn’t know about the 5 clicks on the right button on iPhone

Nothing has ever been said about carrying any info apart from my card for irradiated blood the rest I did myself plus I’m the only one in charge of myself :smiley:

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Ah yes having an In Case of Emergency person’s number available is a good idea too. Managed to be adult enough to do that already!

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Thanks @2DB yes, thanks, I forgot that I have my nearest and dearest contacts under ICE on my landline and mobile

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Hi all,
I wear a snug fitting bracelet with comprehensive personalised info engraved on it. I live alone with comorbidities and a cocktail of meds so it’s a no-brainer for me.

I also carry an even more detailed credit card sized personalised meds details. It includes conditions, meds, ICE, GP, and no NSAID’s or allergies. I also carry a ‘Blue Card’ for Steroids and the 24hr Heamo contact details.

This may seem a bit OTT to some of you but as a former First Aider and Safety Officer I recognise the need for communication within risk management, including the various Doctors I meet. It saves a lot of time for all as long as it remains relevant to current medical conditions.

I was talking to a student doctor in clinic a few weeks ago. He was keen to enquire on my conditions and I was more than happy to do so. As I said to him " If the patient doesn’t/can’t communicate you won’t be a Doctor you’ll be a Vet".

Here’s hoping you all a healthy New Year.

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Had a quick look for an android phone.
When you swipe to get to your keycode, there is an Emergency SOS button at the bottom, hit that and you get a short list of numbers for the responders, no doubt this can be edited.
At the bottom of this page is a symbol with Medical Info.
Sign in and you can add details, including turning it on to allow responders to access it without signing in.
Sad thing next is to find if your phone has a remote wiping option in case it gets lost or stolen.

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Good Afternoon @Erica, and everyone else. I hope that you all survived the Christmas period and all had a wonderful time in your own way. (although that does sound a little weird!)
I managed a visit to my 96 year old Aunt, in Huddersfield, on the 23rd, and then endured an unhelpful puncture on the drive back home to Hinckley.
Christmas Eve I was at my No4 Daughters, joined by No3 Daughter too, before spending the Big Day at Daughter No1 and her family. I had a great time at both venues. Sadly I didn’t get to visit Daughter No2 as she has a house full of sickly people at the moment. Boxing Day I was with my sister and her family and then it was back to work for the rest of the week.

I wear a MedicAlert wrist tag, on a NATO style fabric strap with my “main” ailments on the reverse side, along with my allergies and, I have to say, that it gives me a small sense of security should something untoward or unplanned were to occur, especially as I am a HGV Driver. There is a requirement on the wearer to ensure that the details are kept up to date, both on the physical tag and, probably more importantly, online with the service provider as well.

As always, stay safe, take care, keep on smiling (still no contract from any toothpaste supplier!), be kind to yourselves and enjoy the rest of 2023!

Best Wishes, Jimbo165

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Wow, @Jimbo165 that looks stylish !!!

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Thank you @Erica, and I can only apologise for the hairy arm that it is wrapped around! :rofl:

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